Georgian Museum
105 East Wheeling Street
(parking details)
Lancaster, Ohio 43130
740-654-9923

Sherman House Museum
137 East Main Street
(parking details)
Lancaster, Ohio 43130
740-687-5891 or  740-654-9923
The Georgian Museum is owned and operated by a not-for-profit 501(c)(3) organization.
The Sherman House is owned and operated by a not-for-profit 501(c)(3) organization.
copyright  2014 All rights reserved. Fairfield Heritage Association. Sherman House, Georgian Museum
website by: WebChick.com
The Fairfield Heritage Association connects all people to the rich history of
Fairfield County, Ohio.
Office Hours:  9:00 a.m.- 4:30 p.m., Monday - Friday
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Fairfield Heritage Association on Twitter
Georgian Museum
105 East Wheeling Street,  Lancaster, Ohio 43130
P: 740-654-9923

Sherman House Museum
137 East Main Street,  Lancaster, Ohio 43130
P: 740-687-5891 or  740-654-9923

CHRISTMAS TEA


3 p.m., Sunday, Dec. 7, 2014
Georgian Museum
$35 per ticket, reservations required

The theme is Christmas greeting cards, with Karen Heath as our guest speaker. We'll serve scones and finger sandwiches, cookies and candies, and lots of specially brewed Christmas tea.

SOLD OUT
 

FALL DINNER

You've Come a Long Way, Little Nurse: A POW Story
November 6, 2014
6:30 Social time (cash bar)
6:45 Dinner buffet style
7:30 Business meeting, Coronet presentations & program
9 p.m. Adjourn

Location:
The Lodge in Lancaster
129 E. Main Street
$30 per person


Reservations due Friday, Oct. 31
Call the office: 740-654-9923
 
FHA honors veterans in this year’s Fall Dinner on Thursday, Nov. 6, with the extraordinary story of World War II Army Nurse Sallie Durrett Farmer.

Mary Rogers and Stephanie Van Horn will share their mother’s experience as she shared it with them - truly a unique blend of courage and compassion.Sallie lived in Fairfield County from 1966 until her death in 2003.

She was an Army nurse stationed on the Philippine Islands in December 1941 when Japanese troops invaded the islands and soon took all Allied military troops captive. Sallie spent almost three years as a POW in Santo Tomas Internment Camp, one of the “Angels of Bataan” who worked tirelessly to take care of their fellow prisoners.

Mary and Stephanie are both registered nurses and are employed at Fairfield Medical Center.

The evening’s program will include the presentation of the annual CORONET AWARDS, the FHA annual report and the election of officers to the FHA Board of Directors.
Menu
Beef tips with mushrooms
Oven roasted turkey
Mashed roasted red potatoes
Green beans
Roasted butternut squash
Salad and rolls
Assorted pies and cakes
Coffee and ice tea
Cash bar
This special exhibit consists of a unique collection of artifacts saved during the 123-year history of the institution best known as the Boys’ Industrial School. Among the items on display are photos, crafts and tools made by students, signs and even paperwork on BIS’s most famous resident, the boy who grew up to become Bob Hope.

The exhibit is a joint production of the volunteers who care for the BIS Museum, led by Mike Tharp and Cindy Hillis, and the Fairfield Heritage Association, which owns and operates the Georgian Museum. It serves not only to tell the story of the institution but also to raise interest in creating a permanent home for the BIS Museum.
The collection had been housed in the former BIS administration building but was moved when the building was condemned.

The exhibit opens with a free reception on Oct. 26. The new book on the institution, Echoes from the Hill, by Bill and Jean Venrick, will be on sale at $38.50 plus tax. Mr. Venrick will be on hand to answer questions and sign copies of his book.

Regular viewing hours for the exhibit will be from 1 to 4 p.m., Tuesday through Sunday, and will be included in a paid tour of the Georgian.

Founded as the Ohio Reform School Farm in 1856, the institution was renamed the Boys’ Industrial School in 1885. The name changed again in 1964 to the Fairfield School for Boys. It was closed in 1979, and many of the buildings have been torn down.

“The BIS story makes up an important chapter in Fairfield County’s story,” says Andrea Brookover, executive director of FHA. “We hope this exhibit combined with the Venricks’ book will stir interest in finding the permanent home this collection deserves.”